Savory Brisket

Submitted by Sandra Altman Poliakoff

Brisket.jpg

My mother, Annette Altman, always made her brisket this way, and my mother-in-law Rosa Poliakoff made hers with carrots, celery, and onions and beef broth. Brisket is a no-brainer. The longer it cooks (on a low oven), the more tender it gets, as long as there is liquid for the meat to absorb. Just the smell of brisket cooking in the oven evokes memories of family, holidays and warmth. It is one of the threads that binds one generation to the next.

  • 1 beef brisket, 3-4 lbs, fat trimmed

  • 1 1/2 cups Ketchup

  • 1 package of onion soup mix

  • 1 cup brown sugar

  • 1/4 cup of red wine

Mix ketchup, onion soup mix, brown sugar and red wine. 

Put brisket in a pyrex dish lined with foil. Pour sauce over meat, cover with foil.

Bake on 350 for 4 hours.

Meat is done when fork inserted in meat sinks in easily.

When the meat is done, put on cutting board and slice against the grain. Serve with sauce in the pan.

Sandra and her mother, Annette Altman.

Sandra and her mother, Annette Altman.

Yantaff (Holiday) Chicken and Rice

Submitted by Lyssa Kligman Harvey

My grandmother, Ida Lomansky Kligman, used to cook a chicken for Shabbat dinner in a particular pot every Friday. I have given this chicken pot to my daughter, Jordane Harvey Lotts, since she is such a good cook. Grandma Ida’s chicken would be the same delicious roasted chicken with rice. The chicken would be “fall off the bone” tender or the Yiddish term fatempt. This holiday yantaff chicken and rice recipe is not my grandmother’s. It is combination of many delicious chicken recipes that I have put together. I wanted a crispy but tender sweet chicken. Using the dried fruit and lemon gives it a special flavor for any holiday. I usually make this recipe for Passover as well.

  • 2 cut-up chickens (do not use the backs, if the breasts are large cut in half)

  • 2 cups of instant brown rice or wild rice

  • 4 cups of chicken broth

  • 1 onion, chopped up

  • 2 cloves of garlic, pressed

  • 1 jar of apricot preserves

  • ½ cup of dried apricots

  • ½ cup of dried pitted prunes

  • ½ cup of lemon slices

  • Fresh oregano

  • Olive oil

  • Kosher salt

  • Pepper

Salt and pepper the chicken. Brown the chicken in olive oil in a Dutch oven or large sauce pan and set aside. Brown the onions and garlic in the chicken juice and olive oil that is left in the pan. Oil the bottom of a large baking pan or Pyrex dish or aluminum pan and put the 2 cups of wild rice or brown rice in the pan. Place the chicken on top of the rice. Pour in the 4 cups of chicken broth. Put the onions and garlic and oregano on top of the chicken. Spread the apricot preserves on top of chicken. Sprinkle the apricots, prunes and lemon slices on top of chicken.

Bake the chicken covered for 1 ½ hours at 350 degrees.

Serve with the apricots and prunes and lemon slices on top of the chicken.

Tsimmes

Submitted by Mindy Kligman Odle

Tsimmes..jpg
  • 1 bag of carrots, chopped into large pieces

  • 3 sweet potatoes peeled and chopped into large pieces

  • ½ box of pitted prunes

  • 1 can of cut up pineapple

  • ¼ cup of brown sugar

  • 1 onion cut up

  • A small piece of chuck roast or brisket cut into large pieces

In a Dutch oven or a stew pot; brown the cut up onions and add the cut up meat and cover with water. Cook the meat slowly until it softens and the water is absorbed.

Par boil the carrots, the sweet potatoes, drain and add to the meat.

Add the prunes, brown sugar and the can of cut up pineapple.

Put this mixture in a buttered Pyrex dish.

The traditional way is to mash the vegetables or the more recent way is to leave it in large pieces tossed together and cooked.

Bake for 30-40 minutes at 350.

Chopped Liver

Submitted by Lyssa Kligman Harvey

Chopped Liver.JPG

It’s hard to believe that I now am the designated preparer of Chopped Liver in my family. Then again…no one else really wants to make it. It is a difficult and time consuming recipe. Cooking the liver and hard boiled eggs will certainly give the house a distinct aroma, so I always make sure and prepare it at least 24 hours before serving it. Chopped Liver is akin to liver pate that is usually served as an appetizer or as a side dish…hence the popular saying, “What am I…chopped liver.” It isn’t the centerpiece in a meal, even though it is a heavy meat dish high in protein and cholesterol. Chopped Liver is a dish of Eastern European / Ashkenazi origin that was commonly served in delicatessens. The first time I tasted chopped liver was in a sandwich with my parents in a New York delicatessen called the Carnegie Deli. It was huge. My father, Melton Kligman, happened to love liver. As a child, we would go out to eat at Morrison’s Cafeteria on Thursday nights just so he could order Liver and Onions. On Rosh Hashanah my mother, Helene Firetag Kligman, would make chopped liver and Dad would always make sure that there would be leftovers, so he could make a challah and chopped liver sandwich.

  • 1 lb. chicken liver

  • 1 large sweet onion

  • ¼ cup of sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • Gribenes frozen chicken fat (shmaltz)

  • Mayonnaise

  • Salt and pepper to taste

Boil eggs until hard boiled. Peel shells and set aside to cool.

Wash off liver and set aside.

Chop up frozen chicken fat (schmaltz).

Chop up onion into small pieces

In a large deep skillet, brown chicken fat (schmaltz) until very crispy, put on a paper towel to drain. The fried chicken fat (schmaltz) is now called Gribenes.

Brown the chopped onions using the remaining fat in the skillet.

Add the liver and ¼ cup of sugar and stir until the liver begins to turn brown.

Drain off the liquid from time to time and cook on medium heat until all liver is brown.

Let the liver cool.

Put the liver and eggs in a large bowl and hand chop until chunky or smooth, depending on taste.

Add mayonnaise and salt and pepper to taste.

Serve on a platter with crackers, raw celery and carrots.

After it is made, it will last in the fridge for 3 or 4 days. I like to make it a couple of days before as the flavor seems better.

Honey Cake

Submitted by Shirley Levine

Honey cake.jpg
  • 1 cup honey
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup Wesson oil
  • 2 ½ cups plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • ¼ cup maraschino cherry juice
  • ¼ cup black coffee
  • 1 cup raisins (optional) 
  • ½ cup sliced/ slivered/ almonds (optional) 

In a medium bowl, beat together the honey, sugar, eggs and oil. In another bowl, sift the flour, baking powder, allspice, and cinnamon and set aside. In a small pot, heat the cherry juice and the coffee and add the baking soda and the vanilla. Combine this mixture with the honey, sugar, egg and oil. Slowly add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, mixing thoroughly. Add raisins (optional). Pour the batter into two greased and floured (4x8) loaf pans or one tube pan. Top with almonds, if desired. Bake 1 hour at 300 degrees. Test for doneness. Cake should spring back when gently pressed in the center. Allow the cake to sit for 5 minutes and remove from the pan to a wire rack to cool. 

Kasha Varnishkes

Submitted by Lyssa Kligman Harvey 

Kasha-Varnishkas.jpg

Kasha Varnishkes is a traditional Ashkenazi Eastern European dish. The word Varnishkes is a Yiddish word for a Russian small stuffed dumpling called Varenichki. Kasha is a buckwheat grain that is originally from Asia. It is a creative dish that has a distinct flavor but can be also thought of as a Jewish comfort food.  I can’t remember the first time I tasted Kasha Varnishkes, but it must have been as an adult. The Kasha grain has a strong, toasted flavor and that seems to be the secret when preparing the dish.  I remember only eating this dish at Rosh Hashanah, but it is also served at the Sabbath meal. It is an excellent grain and pasta dish to accompany a brisket or chicken that has lots of sauce or gravy. I started adding it to my Rosh Hashanah meal to add a traditional recipe to the meal. I took several recipes and combined what I liked to make the one I use. I think it would be fun to ask people who have no idea what this dish is…what they think Kasha Varnishkes is! 

 

  • 1 box of Kasha / Buckwheat groats

  • 1 large onion chopped small

  • A dollop of chicken fat/ schmaltz or butter

  • 1 box of small bowtie noodles/ farfalle

  • 4 cups of chicken broth

  • Salt and pepper to taste 

Cook the box of bowtie noodles and drain. 

Fry the chopped onions in the chicken fat or butter until they are caramelized.  

Put the Kasha on an aluminum foil-covered cookie sheet sprayed with Pam and toast the Kasha grain, being careful not to let it burn. 

Bring the 4 cups of chicken broth to boil and put in the Kasha grain. Cook on medium until all the liquid is absorbed about 25-30 minutes. The Kasha should absorb all the water. Mix in the caramelized onions. 

Mix the cooked Kasha, onions and boiled noodles together in a large baking dish and bake for about 20 minutes. It will be dry.   

Serve with brisket or chicken - The Kasha Varnishkes will be a good base for the gravy. 

Rachel's Collards

Submitted by Rachel Gordin Barnett

How I (Finally) Learned to Love Collards

When I was a kid growing up in a small Southern town, the staple lunch was fried chicken, rice and collards. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I could really appreciate those collards. Many Southern vegetable recipes call for pork for seasoning, but in my mother’s semi-Kosher Jewish kitchen, that wasn’t happening. So, to flavor the collards, a pinch of sugar, salt, pepper and butter were used.  I have “skinnied” my recipe now to use olive oil and chicken or vegetable broth to flavor. Italian seasoning and diced tomatoes adds a bit more “gourmet” taste.

  • 16 oz. bag of fresh collards (or one bunch – but will need to be thoroughly cleaned and chopped)
  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 cup low sodium chicken (or vegetable) broth
  • 14.5 oz. can diced tomatoes (or in season - fresh tomatoes work)
  • Small onion, diced
  • 2 tsp. Italian seasoning
  • Pinch of sugar
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Sauté chopped onion in olive oil until soft.  Add fresh collards, diced tomatoes, chicken (or vegetable broth), Italian seasoning, pinch of sugar, S & P. Give a good stir. Cover and cook on medium until vegetables are soft. Adjust seasonings to taste.